Gay men hiv dating dating in humboldt

11-Mar-2018 23:54

”, 43% of HIV-negative men and 62% of HIV-positive men said yes.

Asked a similar question about having an undetectable viral load, 68% of HIV-negative men and 90% of HIV-positive men said yes.

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes online edition, doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000819, 2015.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional.

Almost half of American gay men recruited to a survey via advertising on a major mobile phone dating app say that at least one potential sexual partner has said that he was taking Pr EP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), and even more have interacted with someone who said that he was HIV positive but had an undetectable viral load.

A lovely lady at the other end of the phone carefully but clearly explained: “No, babe.” Yet his status was why I didn’t call up the boy again.Nonetheless, respondents who had had sex without a condom with someone using Pr EP, or with someone who had an undetectable viral load, were asked why they didn’t use condoms.Respondents explained why in their own words and these answers do suggest that many men took the use of biomedical prevention methods into account.The survey found that men with diagnosed HIV were more likely to interact with someone who talked about his Pr EP or undetectable viral load, and were also more likely to meet up and have sex without a condom with him.The researchers noticed a novel seroadaptive behaviour that they call ‘biomed-matching’ – typically an HIV-negative Pr EP user having sex without a condom with an HIV-positive man who has an undetectable viral load.

A lovely lady at the other end of the phone carefully but clearly explained: “No, babe.” Yet his status was why I didn’t call up the boy again.Nonetheless, respondents who had had sex without a condom with someone using Pr EP, or with someone who had an undetectable viral load, were asked why they didn’t use condoms.Respondents explained why in their own words and these answers do suggest that many men took the use of biomedical prevention methods into account.The survey found that men with diagnosed HIV were more likely to interact with someone who talked about his Pr EP or undetectable viral load, and were also more likely to meet up and have sex without a condom with him.The researchers noticed a novel seroadaptive behaviour that they call ‘biomed-matching’ – typically an HIV-negative Pr EP user having sex without a condom with an HIV-positive man who has an undetectable viral load.They suggest that the pairing of two effective prevention methods is likely to be highly effective.