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04-Feb-2018 10:03

YOUR QUESTIONS TO JOHN SIMPSON John is the BBC’s World Affairs Editor and one of your most celebrated correspondents – something I’m sure I don’t have to tell a lot of you.And he’s just been to Zimbabwe, despite Robert Mugabe’s ban on us operating there.

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**UPDATE: NO LUCK WITH JOHN SIMPSON FOR TODAY THOUGH WE MAY BE ABLE TO SPEAK TO HIM LATER IN THE WEEK.** 3.

Ludwig says such parental wariness is not unusual, given blacks' dimmer view of the state of U. "The experience of living as a black person and as a white person in this country is quite different, despite substantial progress since the 1960s." Ludwig and Yancey both agree that interdating is unlikely to increase significantly over the coming decade.

"It's not increasing as fast as some people might be thinking," says Yancey, who says that U. trends overall are trailing media depictions of the phenomenon.

For instance, 72 percent of teens surveyed thought people dated people of other races because they cared about the other person, while less than 20 percent thought their peers interdated as a rebellion against parents or as an attempt to "be cool." Nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of white students who had not dated interracially said they would consider dating someone who was not white, while 58 percent of black students would consider dating a nonblack.

But the Gallup survey also found that teens thought some interracial couples—always involving a black partner—faced potentially greater friction from their respective racial and ethnic groups about their relationships.

**UPDATE: NO LUCK WITH JOHN SIMPSON FOR TODAY THOUGH WE MAY BE ABLE TO SPEAK TO HIM LATER IN THE WEEK.** 3.

Ludwig says such parental wariness is not unusual, given blacks' dimmer view of the state of U. "The experience of living as a black person and as a white person in this country is quite different, despite substantial progress since the 1960s." Ludwig and Yancey both agree that interdating is unlikely to increase significantly over the coming decade.

"It's not increasing as fast as some people might be thinking," says Yancey, who says that U. trends overall are trailing media depictions of the phenomenon.

For instance, 72 percent of teens surveyed thought people dated people of other races because they cared about the other person, while less than 20 percent thought their peers interdated as a rebellion against parents or as an attempt to "be cool." Nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of white students who had not dated interracially said they would consider dating someone who was not white, while 58 percent of black students would consider dating a nonblack.

But the Gallup survey also found that teens thought some interracial couples—always involving a black partner—faced potentially greater friction from their respective racial and ethnic groups about their relationships.

He found that 35.7 percent of white Americans had interdated, along with 56.5 percent of African Americans, 55.4 percent of Hispanic Americans, and 57.1 percent of Asian Americans.